17 Best Comedy Movies on Netflix You’ve Probably Missed

A good comedy film is almost always more than just a sequence of funny scenes. And whether that addition is about darkness of the subject matter, romance, or a coming-of-age story, it is just as important to the success of the film as any other component. Below are highly-rated, little-known films that do both: the most interesting funny movies on Netflix America so to speak.

Our purpose at agoodmovietowatch is to reference good little-known films so that on one hand you never wonder what to watch, and on the other so that deserving movies that went unnoticed or which didn't get the exposure they deserve can be introduced to a large audience. You can find all our suggestions here, and only the ones available on Netflix here.

Shot from the movie Election (1999)

Starring Matthew Broderick and a young Reese Witherspoon as, respectively, Jim McAllister, a high school teacher and Tracy Flick, a notorious ‘that girl’ in his class. When Tracy decides to run for class president, we see the floodgates open as all sorts of bizarre and insane behavior pours out of the two. Quickly, it becomes clear that Tracy will do nearly anything to win, and as circumstances spiral out of control, madness descends – along with hilarity!

Shot from the movie The History of Future Folk (2012)

An alien ordered to colonize Earth abandons his mission when he hears music for the first time and is determined to save his adopted planet. With a combination of a great, low-budget sci-fi plot and a wonderful, whimsical soundtrack, you can’t go wrong with this film. It is goofy, and both lighthearted and heartwarming. It’ll knock your socks off!

Shot from the movie Instructions Not Included (2012)

When a playboy is handed a child from a past fling he moves from Mexico to America to try and find the mother. Once in America he finds himself deep into the role of a father with his transition being one of those sweet moments you never see coming. The whole movie has that tone, of growth, dad-daughter love, charm, and drama to varying extents. The chemistry between the two actors who play father and daughter is beautiful, and adds the last touch to make Instructions Not Included a heartwarming, sweet, and very enjoyable movie.

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Shot from the movie Force Majeure (2014)

A seemingly well-adjusted Scandinavian Family vacationing in the French Alps experiences a frightening avalanche scare near the beginning of Force Majeure, thereby unleashing a cacophony of mistrust and anxiety as their dynamic is shaken to the core. This pitch black comedy from Sweden charts the steady disintegration of the family unit and the father’s psyche in particular, as his reaction to impending death leaves his family deeply questioning his masculinity and prioritization of their well-being. The stages of blame and negotiation play out with painful honesty, holding back very little in a manner that leaves the viewer supremely uncomfortable, as if eavesdropping on a neighbor’s personal affairs. The effect is unsettling yet stunningly honest and often laugh-quietly-on-the-inside worthy in its depiction of human vulnerability. Unlike many narrative films, the “climax” comes at the beginning of Force Majeure, with the remainder of the film acting as an extended denouement in the form of a measured, Kubrickian character study.

Shot from the movie Beautiful Girls (1996)

With an ensemble cast featuring a young Natalie Portman and a less murderous Uma Thurman, Ted Demme’s “Beautiful Girls” recreates the worries and woes that thrive in the minds of a tight knit group of working class friends stuck in their own small town Massachusetts world. Warm, quirky and filled with champagne diamonds, both metaphorical and tangible, for anybody who’s ever walked the thirty something walk, it’s a film that’ll make you want to remember all the friends you wish you still had and actually still do.

Shot from the movie The Grand Seduction (2013)

The Grand Seduction, a remake of 2003 French-Canadian film La Grande Séduction (2003), is a lighthearted comedy about the residents of the small fishing village of Tickle Head, Newfoudland attempting to convince a young doctor to become its long-term caregiver in order to secure a contract for a new petrochemical facility. Desperate to guide the town out of its impoverished conditions and lack of employment opportunities, the citizens band together to pull ever bit out of deceit and chicanery out of their hats (in often laugh-out-loud fashion) in order to sway the young doctor Paul (Taylor Kitsch) into believing that Tickle Head is where he belongs. It’s a lighthearted and funny story, despite undeniably familiar shades of The Shipping News, Doc Hollywood and Funny Farm. Brendan Gleeson is particularly good as the new mayor of town and Paul’s head “seducer”. He gives the film that extra bit of humanity and wry humor that lifts it above the familiar plot points and into “notable recommendation” territory.

Shot from the movie Swingers (1996)
Swingers is the bro-fest regular dudes need. Not enough movies tell the stories of the down-on-luck, kind of uncool wolf-pack that still goes out into town with their wallets on chains hanging from their pockets and try their luck with the ladies. Mike, heart-broken actor-comedian pines over his ex long after she’s been gone, while his guys – Trent, Rob and Sue – try to help him get back in the game in a series of nights club-hopping and wingman-ing. You find yourself empathizing with Mike almost immediately if you’ve ever had a broken heart and root for him throughout his highs and fairly embarrassing lows. Sprinkled with clever references and subtle, refreshing humor, Mike’s journey to find closure is more than likely to warm your heart.
As a bonus, the flawed yet endearing gang of twenty-something struggling actors will take you to that charming 90’s nightlife in Los Angeles (with music to die for, by the way) and remind you that boys will be boys and that they’re just doing their best helping each other and themselves to keep it together with lots of “You’re so money, and you don’t even know it!”.
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Shot from the movie Chef (2014)

A popular chef loses his job and respect after a bad review. He ends up with a food truck and tries to show the world he still has his creative side, while at the same time trying to fix his broken family. Chef is a heartwarming feel-good movie, after you finish it you will want to cook, love your family, travel, and spread the love. One of my favorite movies, I see myself happily watching it again numerous times.

Shot from the movie Your Sister’s Sister (2012)

The acting… oh the acting! Your Sister’s Sister is a fantastic comedy which makes great use of the amazing talents and suitability of its cast, including the criminally underused Emily Blunt. Far smarter, quicker and grown-up than most other Rom-Coms, it’s a film built on secrets, lies and, yes, love, sex and family.

Shot from the movie Dope (2015)

At the same time a fun, crazy, and meaningful movie about Malcom and his friends, high school teenagers and proud geeks who suddenly find themselves immersed in the underground LA drug scene. It’s a 2015 Superbad meets Boyz in the Hood. But in its essence it mostly resembles another beautiful film, Juno, in the way it evolves around a character played perfectly who you get to know, agree and disagree with, and ultimately learn from and relate to. Above all it’s an outright enjoyable film, a smart one too, with a great soundtrack to boot.

Shot from the movie Moonrise Kingdom (2012)

Two twelve year olds, Sam, an introverted Khaki scout (Jared Gilman) and the sharp yet sassy Suzy (Kara Hayward), fall in love and run away to their own personal paradise they call “Moonrise Kingdom.” The young girl’s parents (Bill Murray and Frances McDormand) call the authorities. A search party compiled of the local Sheriff (Bruce Willis), Khaki Scout Troop Leader (Edward Norton) and his scouts along with an assortment of other characters try to track down the young runaways through the wilderness.

The characters are as bright, quirky and colourful as their surroundings. The film’s trademark stylistic handmade art direction and clever camera choices add character to the storytelling itself. Even with its sweet and playful wrapper, major real world issues such as bullying and infidelity are touched upon. Moonrise Kingdom is a delightfully charming film with a meticulously executed plot and sophisticated humour.

Shot from the movie In The Loop (2009)

A hilarious comedy about politics in the UK and US. The secretary of State for Internal Development Simon Foster accidentally backs the plans for a war in the Middle East and suddenly finds he has a lot of friends in Washington. What follows is a difficult to follow maneuvering of pro- and antiwar factions in both governments. The harder it gets to follow what’s going on in the movie the more it resembles our present day politics and the funnier it becomes.

Shot from the movie People Places Things (2015)

«When comedians get a bit older they do a movie with “emotions” in it. Here’s mine.» Flight of the Conchords’ Jemaine Clement on Twitter. People Places Things is exactly that, a funny yet heartfelt comedy. Will Henry, A New York City graphic novelist walks on his girlfriend with whom he has twins cheating on him on the twin’s birthday party. A year later, Will is struggling to define his new life as a single parent while still getting over his breakup. Smart, honest, and charmingly led by Jemaine Clement, this film will strike you in its simplicity.

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Shot from the movie Punch-Drunk Love (2002)

Adam Sandler, though currently imminently marketable, incredibly played out and boring, used to be a real actor. This is the film by which his legacy will be judged, where we see the funnyman drop the mask and actually show real feelings besides bumbling rage. Sandler’s hurt and confused performance is beautifully vulnerable and true and is complimented by P.T. Anderson’s incomparable direction (the man behind Boogie Nights and There Will Be Blood), creating a true masterpiece of American cinema.

Shot from the movie Goon (2012)

Goon is funny, violent, and sweet as hell. You’ll be surprised by how nasty it is but you will not care. What you will want to do, on the other hand, is rip through the screen, hug the main character and smack all the other ones. Goon is also a great example of a feel-good movie that isn’t solely focused on being a feel-good movie, as well as a great love story, with all its absurdities and high emotional load.