The 100 Best Movies on Tubi Right Now

The 100 Best Movies on Tubi Right Now

June 14, 2024

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Tubi is a new streaming platform, similar to Netflix. Except, you don’t have to sign-in to watch movies and more importantly: you don’t have to pay. Tubi is ad-supported.

Below are the best movies on Tubi that we recommend.

41. Hitman Hart: Wrestling With Shadows (1998)

best

8.5

Country

Canada, United States of America

Director

Paul Jay

Actors

Bob Marella, Bret Hart, Brian James, Brian Lee Harris

Moods

Discussion-sparking, True-story-based

This is maybe the last Montreal Screwjob documentary the world will ever need, but in other respects, it’s an incredibly insightful look at the increasingly raunchy late ‘90s WWF through the eyes of the straight-laced Bret “The Hitman” Hart. We get insights into his bond with his sadistic dad Stu Hart, his priorities when caught between a WWF and WCW bidding war, and his loyal fans who in crowd interviews can be described as the coherent and smarter section of the audience. But what makes this one of the greatest and most important pro wrestling documentaries of all time is its divine timing, getting into Bret’s headspace talking about his future before leaving WWF, hearing his wonder before any of the unfortunate events shortly after.

42. Green Day: Bullet in a Bible (2005)

best

8.5

Country

United Kingdom, United States of America

Director

Samuel Bayer

Actors

Adrienne Armstrong, Billie Joe Armstrong, Jason White, Mike Dirnt

Moods

Feel-Good, Raw, Without plot

Green Day’s Bullet in a Bible has certainly aged well. Maybe it’s even better now with time and hindsight, and knowing that the once punk group would commit to their alternative sound from that point forward. Green Day with their American Idiot tracks and frontman Billie Joe Armstrong’s stage presence absolutely belongs as a stadium-level act, but you could argue they could’ve cut down on the heavy American Idiot representation to have more of a mix of albums in the setlist. The film could’ve also had less of the vignettes and montages with edgy editing—we don’t need that many breaks from 14 songs—but it’s all nitpicking, really. Say what you want, but this concert marks the birth of Green Day as rockstars.

43. Nowhere Boy (2010)

best

8.4

Country

Canada, UK, United Kingdom

Director

Female director, Sam Taylor-Johnson

Actors

Aaron Taylor-Johnson, Andrew Buchan, Angela Walsh, Angelica Jopling

Moods

Character-driven, Sunday, Sweet

In a different change of pace, this biopic focuses on John Lennon’s reckless adolescence and family life instead of his soon-to-be iconic music. It brings an epic rockstar many of us have known our entire lives down to a more relatable level. The young Aaron Taylor-Johnston gives a very angsty performance which feels a little over the top at times. Anne-Marie Duff does comes off too flirtatious for a newly formed mother-son relationship but Kristin Scott Thomas outshines them all with her steely demeanor.

44. Undefeated (2011)

best

8.4

Country

United States of America

Director

Daniel Lindsay, T. J. Martin

Actors

Bill Courtney, Chavis Daniels, Montrail 'Money' Brown, Montrail 'Money' Brown

Moods

Emotional, Sunday, Thrilling

Undefeated won an Oscar but since it’s a documentary, few sadly paid attention to it. It tells the story of a football team in a poor area in Tennessee. Kids without a bright future, until the new coach arrives. Yes, that sounds like a very old, cliché tale. But keep in mind it is a documentary, and the story it tells is powerful, gripping, and any familiarity quickly becomes irrelevant. Even if you have no interest in American football, or in sports in general, you will love it and more than likely find yourself reaching for the Kleenex at least a few times before the credits roll.

45. Half Nelson (2006)

8.4

Country

United States of America

Director

Ryan Fleck

Actors

Adepero Oduye, Anthony Mackie, Collins Pennie, Deborah Rush

Moods

Character-driven, Well-acted

The self destructive, substance abusing history teacher Dan (Ryan Gosling) works in a Brooklyn middle-school and is constantly at odds with the curriculum, preferring to teach 13 year old kids Marxist theory in class. Meanwhile, his student Drey (Shareeka Epps) has to go through struggles of her own, her brother being in jail on drug charges and her single mother having to work long hours to make ends meet. Slowly, an unlikely and tender friendship between teacher and student evolves, in which it becomes less and less clear who of them is the adult part. Steering away from cliches, Half Neslon is not your typical social drama. Its intelligent plot twists, great cast (with outstanding performances by both Gossling and Epps) and slow, non dramatic storytelling makes this a highly underestimated movie that, although treating depressive topics without any easy relief for the viewer, will leave with an inner smile, albeit a sad one.

46. Bad Lieutenant (1992)

best

8.4

Country

United States of America

Director

Abel Ferrara

Actors

Bianca Hunter, Bo Dietl, Bob Murphy, Brian McElroy

Moods

Challenging, Character-driven, Dark

Bad Lieutenant is no misnomer: Harvey Keitel’s policeman really is one of NYPD’s worst. Already corrupt, abrasive, and abusive at the film’s outset, the movie chronicles his coked-out descent into total depravity after he’s called to investigate a heinous crime amid rapidly worsening personal circumstances. The brilliance of Bad Lieutenant is therefore a counterintuitive one: as awful as the Lieutenant is, we can’t help but feel emotionally involved because, in Keitel’s bravura performance, we can see the glint of pain — and thus of a person — within.

Always one for provocation, director Abel Ferrara pushes our empathy to — and maybe even beyond — its natural limits, only to break with the film’s hitherto unrelenting grit and dangle the glinting possibility of transcendent redemption in front of us. Anyone familiar with Catholic guilt cinema (movies like Martin Scorsese’s Who’s That Knocking At My Door and Mean Streets) will instantly recognize the same undercurrent running through Bad Lieutenant — even if Ferrara takes the idea of juxtaposing the profane with the sacred to the extreme here.

47. Finders Keepers (2015)

best

8.4

Country

United States of America

Director

Bryan Carberry, J. Clay Tweel

Actors

John Wood, Shannon Whisnant

Moods

Character-driven, Discussion-sparking, Quirky

A wacky viral story — the kind that gets played for laughs at the end of news broadcasts — gets uncommonly deep consideration in this documentary gem. That’s not to say that Finders Keepers ignores the surreal comedy of the situation that John Wood and Shannon Whisnant, two star-crossed North Carolina men, found themselves in in 2007: battling over the custody rights of John’s mummified amputated leg. The humor in this bizarre tale and all the myriad eccentricities of its real-life characters is never left untapped, but to simply focus on that would add nothing new to the way the story had been told thus far. 

Unlike the many clips from news segments and reality TV that we see in the film, Finders Keepers instead looks beyond the low-hanging fruit and finds deep pathos simmering under the surface of this wacky tale. What emerges is a complex, often tragic, and very American picture of the way traumas shape our lives, the addictive pull of drugs and attention, and fate’s habit of twisting nightmares into blessings and vice versa. It’s the kind of film that makes you wonder how many other unexpectedly poignant stories have been short-changed by our impulse to be flippant.

48. Wild Style (1983)

best

8.4

Country

United States of America

Director

Charlie Ahearn

Actors

Busy Bee, Daze, Dondi, Fab 5 Freddy

Moods

Easy, Lighthearted, Original

This cult classic is the first hip-hop movie in cinema’s history — and, aptly, one of the most sampled movies in rap music. With a cast drawn exclusively from the NYC graffiti, breakdancing, and rap subcultures that it spotlights, Wild Style wisely doesn’t try too hard to construct a conventional drama. Instead, there are toe-tapping scenes in neon-lit, smoke-filled clubs that stretch far beyond usual cinematic limits because they’re following the dynamic pace and infectious rhythm of the battling emcees, not film’s rules.

In lieu of a plot, Wild Style captures the singular atmosphere of the period it was filmed in, when hip-hop culture was thriving and art curators had begun to look to graffiti artists to fill their galleries. That uneasy turning point in the culture is chronicled here through the perspective of Zoro (real graffiti “writer” Lee Quiñones), a young artist who looks on with disdain as his peers embrace the commercialization of their medium by NYC’s art world. (As he shrewdly puts it, risk is central to graffiti’s identity — made for subway cars and walls, not framed canvases.) Brilliantly capturing the freewheeling spirit of NYC’s hip-hop scene, this is a time capsule that never feels dusty thanks to the appropriately off-the-cuff filmmaking.

49. The Trotsky (2009)

best

8.3

Country

Canada

Director

Jacob Tierney

Actors

Alain Goulem, Angela Galuppo, Anne-Marie Cadieux, Ben Mulroney

Moods

Easy, Funny

A fantastic and light Canadian comedy, the Trotsky stars Jay Baruchel as Leon Bronstein, a young man who believes himself to be the reincarnation of the Soviet leader Leon Trotsky. True to his past life, Leon soon begins a quest to organize a revolution at his father’s clothing company, while dealing with the transition from ritzy private to a Montreal public school. Smart and pointed, the Trotsky is a gem not to be missed.

50. There Are No Fakes (2019)

best

8.3

Director

Jamie Kastner

Actors

Kevin Hearn

Moods

Mind-blowing

The highly unusual story of this documentary starts with Kevin Hearn, a member of the band Barenaked Ladies, realizing that his painting by famous Canadian Indigenous artist Norval Morrisseau is a fake. When he sues the collector he bought it from, he starts a series of inquiries that unravel a story that gets progressively darker: drug dealing, organized crime, addiction, sexual abuse, and completely crazy characters (reminiscent of Tiger King).

Behind all of that, There Are No Fakes is about the exploitation not only of Indigenous art but of Indigenous people in Canada in general.

Comments

A
Anonymous

In reading the top 100 films article, I read first 35 of them and only a handful of movies had well known actors. Many are B MOVIES only. With inflation got rid of DISH as a disabled senior for live streaming. Even DISH with paid movie channels had 2 good movies repeatedly play and rest B MOVIES and expensive. Directed to ROKU device and TUBI, being an avid movie watcher, TV is no longer a viable source of GOOD ENTERTAINMENT. New movies have to reach guidelines of only having a few blacks, Spanish and guys to be eligible to win any awards. Liberals are destroying a half sane world.

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