The Best Amazon Prime Movies for Your Parents

The Best Amazon Prime Movies for Your Parents

February 16, 2024

Share:

twitter
facebook
reddit
pinterest
link

It can be a real challenge to get your parents to break from their existing movie-watching habits. Maybe they sit passively through a disappointing film on TV, or maybe they’re swayed too much by whatever popular content the algorithms show them. Luckily, our job here at agoodmovietowatch is to recommend high-quality movies that your parents won’t just have to tolerate, that are under-the-radar enough to give them a unique and hopefully more substantial viewing experience. And thanks to Amazon Prime Video’s extensive library of films—old and new, challenging and accessible—available for streaming, rent of purchase, your folks should always have something new to check out.

21. Finding Forrester (2000)

6.9

Country

United States of America

Director

Gus Van Sant

Actors

Alex Trebek, Alison Folland, Anna Paquin, April Grace

Moods

Inspiring

Finding Forrester is the rainy afternoon type, or a summer night film — it’s a traditional American movie so to speak, with all the components to make your traditional need for a traditional movie more than satisfied. It tells the story of two writers, a young black kid living in a ghetto and struggling to admit his passion for writing over his passion for Basketball (played by Rob Brown), and a Pulitzer Prize winning writer who has renounced his success for unknown reasons (played by Sean Connery). The plot is predictable, and in that traditional sense, very enjoyable. Directed by Gus Van Sant, it will feel almost as a sequel to Good Will Hunting but trust me, this ends up being a great thing too.

22. World’s Greatest Dad (2009)

6.9

Country

United States of America

Director

Bobcat Goldthwait

Actors

Alexie Gilmore, Bobcat Goldthwait, Cheri Minns, Daryl Sabara

Moods

Dark, Dramatic, Funny

Summary: it’s a really unusual movie, especially for a star like Robin Williams. It’s almost an indie film actually. Robin Williams plays Lance Clayton, the father of a typical rude teenage boy Kyle Clayton (Daryl Sabara) wherein Sabara’s character meets an unusual demise, and out of embarrassment of the situation the father ghost-writes a suicide note from his son. This white lie leads to another and another and so on until his lies spread further than anticipated. The movie definitely earns points for making the film that was set out to be made. They wanted to make a dark comedy and a dark comedy was what they made. It’s even uncomfortable to watch at times. Between Lance’s love life and Kyle’s non-existent one there’s enough awkwardness that you feel like you can’t wait to get to the next scene just so this one can be over. All in all the actors did a truly fantastic job. Each character seemed well developed by the individual actor to the point where every gesture, line delivery, and awkward silence seemed too natural and organic. Additionally, the writing was exceptional for this movie, as no dialogue was ever wasted. Each and every little detail in each and every shot of each and every scene was very carefully designed to continually push the aesthetics, this film is a big success.

23. The World’s Fastest Indian (2005)

6.9

Country

Japan, New-Zealand, Switzerland

Director

Roger Donaldson

Actors

Aaron Murphy, Alison Bruce, Annie Whittle, Anthony Hopkins

Moods

Character-driven, Easy, Feel-Good

You know Anthony Hopkins as the evil Hannibal Lecter, but in this film he gives a warm and heartfelt performance portraying real life New Zealand motorcycle legend Burt Munro who set a land speed record in 1967 on a hand-built 1920 Indian. It’s a story of never giving up on your dream even in the face of ridicule and opposition. Hopkins’ performance turns what could have been just another schmaltzy formulaic story line into true gold. You’ll be cheering for Burt/Anthony by the end!

24. Escape from Mogadishu (2021)

6.9

Country

South Korea

Director

Ryoo Seung-wan

Actors

Ahn Se-ho, Han Chul-woo, Heo Joon-ho, Jeong Man-sik

Moods

Action-packed, Dramatic, Suspenseful

Escape from Mogadishu follows diplomats from the North and South Korean embassies as they put aside their differences and work together to escape from an outbreak of civil war in Mogadishu, Somalia. Director Ryoo Seung-wan provides thrilling, high-budget action, especially intense car chases and suspenseful escape scenes that pump you with adrenaline and leave you on the edge of your seat. However, the Somali side of the story leaves much to be desired. Only existing to kill or be killed, the depiction of the Somalians is distasteful, and the country it’s set in seen as nothing more than a senseless warzone.

It’s in crafting a political thriller where Ryoo strikes a chord, following the tradition of South Korean films and dramas that question the current South/North relations. It’s also the aspect that pushed this film to win awards, given that it’s based on a true story from the 1991 civil war in Somalia, albeit with blockbuster flair. Sure, it’s a highly fictionalized story, but the political tensions and heightened atmosphere make good entertainment. And, as with all Korean thrillers, you’ll have to get on a certain wavelength of melodrama to be fully on board with the bonkers yet emotional escape.

25. Hot Potato: The Story of The Wiggles (2023)

6.8

Country

Australia, New-Zealand, United States of America

Director

Female director, Sally Aitken

Actors

Anthony Field, Bindi Irwin, Caterina Mete, Emma Watkins

Moods

Easy, Feel-Good, Heart-warming

While this documentary may not provide the level of insight or as cohesive a narrative as other films from recent years about children’s entertainment, Hot Potato benefits from the sheer charm and approachability of The Wiggles themselves. It’s inspiring to see these men and women be perfectly ordinary people who just patiently put in the work to get to where they are today. The film doesn’t necessarily find a central idea or philosophy behind The Wiggles’ music, but their creativity and enthusiasm for performing manages to turn the simplest things (like fruit salad) into a celebration of life. The documentary isn’t particularly good at balancing its tones, especially when it deals with the struggles that various Wiggles have faced in their personal lives, but it remains likable and wholesome all the same.

26. A Million Miles Away (2023)

6.3

Country

Mexico, United States of America

Director

Alejandra Márquez Abella, Female director

Actors

Ashley Ciarra, Blake Webb, Bobby Soto, Emma Fassler

Moods

Easy, Feel-Good, Heart-warming

A Million Miles Away sticks so closely to the Hollywood biopic template that it threatens to be less about José Hernández as a person with his own complexities and more about the idea of him as a one-size-fits-all inspirational figure. This isn’t to say the film isn’t effective when it really counts; Hernández is worth admiring not necessarily because of his ultimate success, but because how much he failed and got back up again. Director Alejandra Márquez Abella keeps the film’s tone light and bouncy, flattening some of its more serious moments, but also helping make Hernández’s long, hard road to space more of a process of discovery. It’s easy, inspiring viewing that quietly tiptoes past harder questions about poverty and NASA’s potentially discriminatory practices.

27. Candy Cane Lane (2023)

6.2

Country

United States of America

Director

Reginald Hudlin

Actors

Aidan Kennedy, Ali Astin, Amy Johnston, Anjelah Johnson-Reyes

Moods

A-list actors, Easy, Funny

Proof that even the most tired tropes (which the holiday genre is arguably entirely made up of at this point) can still be warm and enjoyable with above-average craft and a fun cast, Candy Cane Lane avoids the monotony that tends to plague other Christmas movies. Which isn’t to say that the film is a new classic—it still concludes too easily and doesn’t give its more emotional side the space to breathe. But with an entertaining fantasy premise (specifically, a sort of scavenger hunt based on The Twelve Days of Christmas) bolstered by strong visual effects and supporting actors who have been given free rein to improvise, the movie stays dynamic and lightly humorous, if a little lacking in substance.

28. Five Blind Dates (2024)

5.0

Country

Australia

Director

Shawn Seet

Actors

Desmond Chiam, Ilai Swindells, Jon Prasida, Rob Collins

Moods

Lighthearted, No-brainer, Romantic

Five Blind Dates is a squeaky clean, hopelessly boring film pretending to be a raunchy romcom. Despite Lia (Shuang Hu) going on five (or four, really) dates, she doesn’t find real chemistry with any one of them. There’s no heat, no passion, no inane fun to be had, or reckless experimentation. It’s clear that what she’s after isn’t really love but a partner who accepts her traditional whims, which I guess counts as a happy ending if this were airing on Hallmark or any other wholesome TV channel. But it isn’t, and instead of embracing its true form—that is, family drama—it instead postures as a modern and exciting romcom, even though it contains zero spice.

To be fair, the film has its funny moments, and I do think the first date’s premise, while played for laughs, has the potential to spark an interesting discussion about our generation’s willingness to sacrifice intimacy for financial security. But the film doesn’t really go there, nor anywhere, and remains as stale and safe as can be.

Comments

Add a comment

Curated by humans, not algorithms.

agmtw

© 2024 A Good Movie to Watch. Altona Studio, LLC, all rights reserved.