100 Best Underrated Comedy Movies of All Time

100 Best Underrated Comedy Movies of All Time

May 4, 2024

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Comedy is so much more than the loudmouthed slapstick humor that still dominates screens to this day. This isn’t to slander the average farce, some of which are actually hilarious, but there are also dark comedies, romantic comedies, meta comedies, and satire comedies to enjoy. In other words, there are many shades of funny, but we miss out on a lot of them when we only tune into what’s popular. 

Below we round up our 100 favorite comedy films of all time. These movies are highly rated but little seen, meaning there’s a high chance of them being underrated. If you’ve already gone through the usual films that appear in lists like this, go give the ones below a try and have your faith in funny be restored. 

51. What We Do in the Shadows (2014)

best

8.4

Country

New-Zealand, United States of America

Director

Jemaine Clement, Taika Waititi

Actors

Ben Fransham, Chelsie Preston Crayford, Cohen Holloway, Cori Gonzalez-Macuer

Moods

Funny

Deadpan comedy styled as a mockumentary, following four flatmates who happen to be vampires. They range in ages from 183 to 8000, and spend their nights trying to adapt to modern day living, eating,   reminiscing about old times, and solving the problems that come with every shared flat. It is filmed in a fake documentary style similar to The Office, with one-on-one interviews interspersed into the film. From the creators of Flight Of The Conchords and Boy, it is a truly great, hilarious comedy that you will not want to miss!

52. The Fundamentals of Caring (2016)

best

8.4

Country

United States of America

Director

Rob Burnett, Robert Meyer Burnett

Actors

Alan Boell, Alex Huff, Ashley White, Bill Murphey

Moods

Easy, Feel-Good, Funny

The Fundamentals of Caring is an offbeat comedy/drama starring Paul Rudd as a man attempting to overcome his looming divorce by becoming the caretaker for a teenager with muscular dystrophy (Craig Roberts, Submarine). The two develop an unconventional relationship based largely on sarcasm and profanity, delivering many laugh-out-loud moments, while also slowly exposing the pain each is carrying inside.

Together, at Ben’s urging, they embark on a road trip across the western United States for Craig to see the world. It’s somewhat formulaic but fun and touching road movie that covers much familiar ground, but also offers a fine illustration of caregiving, personal growth, and emotional healing. Paul Rudd is as good ever, and Roberts is utterly superb. One of the best movies on the Netflix Originals catalog, and an undeniable winner, all-in-all.

53. Eddie the Eagle (2016)

best

8.4

Country

Germany, UK, United Kingdom

Director

Dexter Fletcher

Actors

Ania Sowinski, Anthony Chisholm, Aria DeMaris, Christopher Walken

Moods

A-list actors, Feel-Good, Heart-warming

Michael “Eddie” Edwards (Taron Egerton) was a man with big glasses and even bigger dreams. As a physically disabled child-turned-oddly determined young adult, he tried his hands at all kinds of sports to earn himself a place in United Kingdom’s Team, only to be shunned and rejected more times than one can count. While his coming home a hero can easily be attributed to Great Britain’s lack of a ski jumper representative to the 1988 Calgary Winter Olympics, the world has Eddie’s perseverance and never-say-die attitude to thank. A story about conquering greater heights and just taking flight, Eddie the Eagle shows the world how winning doesn’t always mean taking home the crown.

54. Four Lions (2010)

best

8.4

Country

France, UK, United Kingdom

Director

Chris Morris, Christopher Morris

Actors

Adeel Akhtar, Adil Mohammed Javed, Alex MacQueen, Arsher Ali

Moods

Dark, Dramatic, Funny

Four Lions is as black and as dark as a movie can ever get, mixing cultural relevancy with humor and ridiculousness. It is insensitive to Islam, insensitive to terrorism and insensitive to the viewer. But it is hilarious. The director spent three years talking to Imams, terrorism experts and basically everyone. The result? A legit 97 minutes that will dazzle even extremists with its knowledge of Islam and the accuracy of its lines. Needless to say that it will upset quite a few people, but that is always a good sign for black comedy movies, right?

55. Hit the Road (2021)

best

8.4

Country

Iran

Director

Panah Panahi

Actors

Amin Simiar, Hasan Ma'juni, Pantea Panahiha, Rayan Sarlak

Moods

Gripping, Original, Thought-provoking

A road trip movie with an unknown destination, Hit the Road plays with our expectations by avoiding any obvious questions we might have, and making us focus on the real important things. Informed by the censorship and persecution faced by critics of Iran’s government—including director Panah Panahi’s own filmmaker father, Jafar—the film places more focus on the very act of escape and what that can take from a family. And most importantly, through Panahi’s skillful direction of rural Iran’s varied, beautiful landscapes, he creates a conflicted relationship between character and setting, with entire emotional crescendos playing out just through a single shot of the environment. It’s one of the most underappreciated movies of the year.

56. West Beirut (1998)

best

8.4

Country

Belgium, France, Lebanon

Director

Ziad Doueiri

Actors

Carmen Lebbos, Liliane Nemri, Mohamad Chamas, Rami Doueiri

Moods

Thought-provoking, Touching, Warm

Director Ziad Doueiri is one of the first filmmakers to successfully break through to the global stage out of Lebanon, and West Beirut, which was selected as the country’s entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 1999 Academy Awards, is one of his most accomplished films.

The film stars the director’s son Rami Doueiri as Tarek, a young Lebanese boy who loves to shoot with his Super 8 camera and go on small adventures with his friends Omar and May in the streets of Beirut. But one day, he is faced with the ugly truth of the Lebanese civil war. As he learns more and more about the divided state of his country, he sets out on a mission in search of any lingering hope to help keep the beautiful idea he has of his country locked safe and sound in his brain. “Whoever asks about your religion, you tell them I’m Lebanese.”

57. Last Night (1998)

best

8.4

Country

Canada, France

Director

Don McKellar

Actors

Arsinée Khanjian, Bob Martin, Bruce McDonald, Bryan Renfro

Moods

Dark, Sweet, Well-acted

Forgoing the typical catastrophic approach to the apocalypse, writer, star, and director Don McKellar opts for a grounded tone in Last Night, a film about the end of the world. In it, various Torontonians figure out how best to celebrate and mourn their final hours on Earth. While McKellar’s character Patrick originally planned to spend the day alone, he finds himself gravitating to Sandra (Sandra Oh), a stranger who he gets to know in a series of conversations.

Last Night is more like Before Sunrise than The Day After Tomorrow in that way, filled as it is with thought-provoking dialogue and interesting insights into everyday characters. Whether it was intentional or due to the obviously limited budget, the decision to leave out details like why the world is ending and how is a clever one since it allows us to hyperfocus on everyone’s psyche and inner workings. There is desperation, longing, and anxiety, but also relief, gratitude, and joy. 

If you’re watching it for the first time, you’ll be delighted to find surprise stars populate this lo-fi production—apart from McKellar and Oh, well-regarded auteurs Sarah Polley (Stories We Tell) and David Cronenberg (Crimes of the Future) also make welcome appearances. 

58. Hyenas (1992)

best

8.4

Country

France, Italy, Netherlands

Director

Djibril Diop Mambéty

Moods

Discussion-sparking, Funny, Thought-provoking

Restored in 2019, Djibril Diop Mambéty’s adaptation of the 1956 play, The Visit, presents a powerful allegory of societal decay through the story of Linguère Ramatou, a woman who returns to her impoverished hometown with an offer that can change everything. Mambéty’s skillful direction captures the complexities of human nature and the moral choices we face in a world driven by greed and corruption in a global capitalist world. The narrative unfolds with precision, blending dark humor and piercing social commentary. With or without the context of its original influence, Hyenas is a brilliant Senegalese film.

 

59. Sanctuary (2023)

best

8.4

Country

France, United States of America

Director

Zachary Wigon

Actors

Christopher Abbott, Margaret Qualley

Moods

Challenging, Character-driven, Gripping

Challenging, strange, and utterly captivating from start to finish, Sanctuary takes the relationship between a pathetic, wealthy man and a desperate, plucky young woman—a relationship built on consensual acts of sexual humiliation—and makes it so much more dynamic and entertaining than it has any right to be. The film takes place entirely in one hotel suite over the course of one night, becoming a series of increasingly absurd psychological scenarios, as the characters wrestle over ideas of power, shame, and identity by concealing and roleplaying various parts of themselves. It’s a wild take on several different genres that director Zachary Wigon is able to effortlessly weave together with excellent pacing, stunning visuals, and two truly committed performances from Christopher Abbott and a wonderfully unhinged Margaret Qualley.

60. Sexy Beast (2000)

best

8.4

Country

Spain, United Kingdom, United States of America

Director

Jonathan Glazer

Actors

Álvaro Monje, Amanda Redman, Andy Lucas, Ben Kingsley

Moods

Dramatic, Intense, Original

In his debut feature, Jonathan Glazer masterfully subverts our expectations of heist movies to thrilling effect: what should be a perfunctory moment — the classic recruitment scene — is stretched out into nearly an entire film of its own here, and we’re not off the edge of our seat for even a second of it.

All retired Cockney gangster Gal (Ray Winstone) wants to do is lounge around the pool of his Spanish villa with beloved wife Deedee (Amanda Redman). But now there’s a spanner in the works: an unhinged old acquaintance, Don Logan (Ben Kingsley, never better), has unexpectedly rocked up at Gal’s hacienda to enlist him for a big job on behalf of the London underworld’s top brass. Don is the type of man you just don’t say “no” to, but the pull of Gal’s idyllic retirement is so powerful that he does just that, a narrative swerve that spins this film off the well-worn (but still enjoyable) track we expected it to follow. Directed with cool assurance, full of unforgettable set-pieces, overflowing with style, and even further distinguished by some surreal touches that really get under the skin, this is one of the slickest, funniest, and most exhilarating crime movies ever.

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