100 Best Movies on Curzon in the UK

100 Best Movies on Curzon in the UK

June 11, 2024

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Throughout the years, Curzon has made a name for itself as the ultimate theatre for arthouse cinema, and now that we’re in the streaming age, the same still holds true. It still gives movie lovers the chance to see festival darlings, auteur hits, experimental indies, and international films via its online video rental platform Curzon Home Cinema. 

There are thousands of good movies there, especially since the selection is already heavily curated by a dedicated team of cinephiles. But we think we can further refine that number to the best hundred you’ll find on the platform. Below, we gathered the very best movies you can rent on Curzon right now.

61. Never Look Away (2018)

8.4

Country

Germany, Italy

Director

Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck

Actors

Andreas Nickl, Anton Rubtsov, Bastian Trost, Ben Becker

Moods

Depressing, Discussion-sparking, Dramatic

It’s impossible to describe this incredible movie as one thing or the other. It’s an epic three-hour saga that takes you through the Nazi era, the communist era, the rise of capitalism, and the East and West German divide. But more than its historic value, it’s a coming-of-age story, one that is based on the experiences of famed German artist Gerhard Richter. It’s also a romance, following his experiences finding love and being hit with loss (in no particular order). If you liked the director’s other work, the Oscar-winning The Lives of Others, you’re sure to love this too.

62. The Double Life of Véronique (1991)

best

8.4

Country

France, Norway, Poland

Director

Krzysztof Kieślowski

Actors

Alain Frérot, Aleksander Bardini, Bogusława Schubert, Chantal Neuwirth

Moods

Mind-blowing, Original

Krzysztof Kieślowski’s drama stars Irène Jacob as two identical women living separate lives, and the intricate and indelible ways in which they are bound together. While Weronika, a Polish singer, balances her familial duties and intimate romantic relationship, a French music teacher named Véronique senses that she is not alone.

The Double Life of Véronique’s hypnotic and entrancing qualities will wash over you like a tide crashing over a bed of sand. It is a tough film to capture in words, when so much of it is just beyond words—Kieślowski’s film is one to be seen, sensed, and experienced. 

63. Sexy Beast (2000)

best

8.4

Country

Spain, United Kingdom, United States of America

Director

Jonathan Glazer

Actors

Álvaro Monje, Amanda Redman, Andy Lucas, Ben Kingsley

Moods

Dramatic, Intense, Original

In his debut feature, Jonathan Glazer masterfully subverts our expectations of heist movies to thrilling effect: what should be a perfunctory moment — the classic recruitment scene — is stretched out into nearly an entire film of its own here, and we’re not off the edge of our seat for even a second of it.

All retired Cockney gangster Gal (Ray Winstone) wants to do is lounge around the pool of his Spanish villa with beloved wife Deedee (Amanda Redman). But now there’s a spanner in the works: an unhinged old acquaintance, Don Logan (Ben Kingsley, never better), has unexpectedly rocked up at Gal’s hacienda to enlist him for a big job on behalf of the London underworld’s top brass. Don is the type of man you just don’t say “no” to, but the pull of Gal’s idyllic retirement is so powerful that he does just that, a narrative swerve that spins this film off the well-worn (but still enjoyable) track we expected it to follow. Directed with cool assurance, full of unforgettable set-pieces, overflowing with style, and even further distinguished by some surreal touches that really get under the skin, this is one of the slickest, funniest, and most exhilarating crime movies ever.

64. A Summer’s Tale (1996)

best

8.4

Country

France

Director

Éric Rohmer

Actors

Aimé Lefèvre, Amanda Langlet, Aurelia Nolin, Gwenaëlle Simon

Moods

Character-driven, Discussion-sparking, Easy

The sunniest installment of Éric Rohmer’s Tales of the Four Seasons series is a sly, slow burn of a character study. Everything looks sensuously beautiful in the honey-toned French sunshine, except for the ugly egotism of Gaspard (Melvil Poupaud), the full extent of which is gradually revealed over the film’s runtime to amusing — if maddening — effect.

A brooding twenty-something, Gaspard has the traumatic task of having to decide between three beautiful and brilliant young women while vacationing alone on the French coast one summer. He dithers and delays his choice, each woman appealing to a different insecurity of his — but, as frustrating and plainly calculating as he is, you can’t help but be charmed by Gaspard. That’s partly because of Poupaud’s natural charisma, but also because Rohmer grants Gaspard as many searingly honest moments as he does deceitful ones. These come through Rohmer’s hallmark naturalistic walking and talking scenes (a big influence on the films of Richard Linklater), coastal rambles that produce conversations of startling, timeless candor. That inimitable blend of breeziness and frankness is never better matched in the director’s films than by the summer setting of this one, the sharp truths going down a lot smoother in the gorgeous sunlight.

65. The Sweet Hereafter (1997)

best

8.4

Country

Canada

Director

Atom Egoyan

Actors

Alberta Watson, Allegra Denton, Arsinée Khanjian, Brooke Johnson

Moods

Challenging, Character-driven, Dark

The Sweet Hereafter is the kind of movie that feels very different from the one you might imagine when reading the plot synopsis. The tragic accident at its center doesn’t form a dramatic crescendo as you might be primed to expect — and, despite revolving around a lawsuit, this is no courtroom drama. Instead, the ironically titled The Sweet Hereafter deals with the messy, difficult emotions that come with grief, survival, and blame in the aftermath of a bus crash, with the film largely taking place in a snowy Canadian town rent apart by the loss of nearly all its children in the accident. Ian Holm plays the out-of-town lawyer battling to unite the bereft parents behind a class action lawsuit, all while struggling to deal with the quasi-loss of his own drug-dependent daughter. Non-linear chronology means the before-the-crash and the after intermingle, scene after scene; it’s an unorthodox remix of the way we’re used to seeing this kind of story unfold, but it allows the movie to home in on the complexity of the community’s pain. Unsparing performances, haunting music, and meditative cinematography plunge us into it all, recreating the terrible iciness of grief in a way that is difficult to shake off.

66. Anatomy of a Fall (2023)

best

8.4

Country

France

Director

Female director, Justine Triet

Actors

Alexandre Bertrand, Anne Rotger, Anne-Lise Heimburger, Antoine Bueno

Moods

Character-driven, Gripping, Raw

You would expect a courtroom drama to be built around damning pieces of evidence, passionate speeches, or certain social issues lending weight to the investigation. But what makes Justine Triet’s Palme d’Or-winning Anatomy of a Fall so remarkable is how direct it is. Triet doesn’t treat this case like a puzzle for the audience to participate in solving; instead she fashions this trial into a portrait of a family being eroded by even just the suggestion of distrust. It ultimately has far less to do with who’s responsible for the death of a man, and more to do with the challenge of facing the reality that the people we love are capable of being cruel and callous to others.

Which isn’t to say that Anatomy of a Fall doesn’t still possess qualities that make it a great courtroom drama—doubt only continues to pile up with every new piece of information that’s revealed to the audience, until we begin to interpret characters’ expressions and actions in a contradictory ways. But the way Triet executes these reveals is just so skillful, choosing precisely how to let details slip and obscuring everything behind faulty memory, intentional dishonesty, or any other obstacles that usually come up during an investigation.

67. The Florida Project (2017)

best

8.3

Country

United Kingdom, United States of America

Director

Sean Baker

Actors

Aiden Malik, Andrew Romano, Bria Vinaite, Brooklynn Prince

Moods

Heart-warming, Touching

Every once in a while there are movies that expand the definition of quality film-making. This is one of those movies.

Here is an incredible, yet delicate film that follows three children from poor families who are stuck living in subpar motels. Their lives and friendships are portrayed with honesty and precise aesthetics. It’s a story that at first seems as plot-free as life itself.

It succeeds in capturing an innocence that is usually reserved to a child’s imagination: a precarious living condition full of adventures and fun. It’s hard to describe it beyond that; it’s the kind of film that must be seen to be fully understood.

And it ends on a very high note.

68. Babette’s Feast (1987)

best

8.3

Country

d, Denmark

Director

Gabriel Axel

Actors

Asta Esper Hagen Andersen, Axel Strøbye, Bendt Rothe, Bibi Andersson

Moods

Dramatic, Heart-warming, Lovely

Sisters Martine and Filippa, daughters of a founder of a religious sect, live a simple and quiet life in a remote coastal village in Denmark. Throughout the course of their lives, they reject possible romances and fame as part of their commitment to deny earthly attachments. This is upended by the sudden arrival of a French immigrant named Babette, who served as their house help to escape the civil war raging in her country.

Babette’s Feast is an inquiry into simplicity and kindness, and whether these would be sufficient to achieve a life of contentment. The religious undertones perfectly fit with the film’s parable-like structure, where bodily and spiritual appetites are satisfied through a sumptuous feast of love, forgiveness, and gratitude.

69. Boiling Point (2021)

best

8.3

Country

United Kingdom

Director

Philip Barantini

Actors

Áine Rose Daly, Alex Heath, Alice May Feetham, Caroline Garnell

Moods

Gripping, Intense, Raw

One of the most overlooked films in recent years, Boiling Point is an intense British drama about the life of a head chef. We get to view his world for exactly 90 minutes and, yes, it is all shot in one go. No camera tricks or quirks, just pure filmmaking. Many other movies have tried to capture the chaotic life inside the restaurant business, but none have worked quite well as Boiling Point.

Working alongside the phenomenal actor Stephen Graham, director Philip Barantini hits it out of the park in his second feature-length film. Together, they bring to life some of the most unnerving 90 minutes ever put to film. Think Uncut Gems but with Gordon Ramsay as the lead.

70. Anomalisa (2016)

best

8.3

Country

UK, United Kingdom, United States of America

Director

Charlie Kaufman, Duke Johnson

Actors

David Thewlis, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Tom Noonan

Moods

Character-driven, Depressing, Mind-blowing

Putting the inherent eeriness of stop motion animation to perfect use, Charlie Kaufman and Duke Johnson’s Anomalisa create a legitimately disturbing experience of a man’s paranoid delusions, as he tries desperately to make a real human connection while perceiving everyone around him as the same person. It’s that (unfortunately) rare animated film that understands that this medium can tell complex, even terrifying, stories for grown-ups while respecting their intelligence. And it’s still gorgeously put together, with seamless movements from the character puppets and evocative lighting and cinematography that puts the film firmly in the uncanny valley. It’s a tougher watch than it looks, but the depth of feeling it captures is nothing short of totally human.

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