100 Best Movies to Rent on Sky Store UK Right Now

100 Best Movies to Rent on Sky Store UK Right Now

May 17, 2024

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A cursory visit to the Sky Store will have you know that the video rental store houses plenty of smash hits. Recent blockbusters, buzzworthy nominees, and beloved fan favorites are all in abundance. 

But what you might not know is that Sky also has a great many hidden gems under its belt. From indie darlings to critics’ picks to forgotten classics, there is a wealth of beautiful movies just waiting to be discovered (or rediscovered) on the platform. And as a bonus, they often cost way less than the latest films, too. 

So if you’re looking for a great watch Sky Store in the UK, then you’ve come to the right place. Below, we round up the best movies you can rent in the Sky Store right now.

81. Embrace of the Serpent (2015)

best

8.7

Country

Argentina, Colombia, Venezuela

Director

Ciro Guerra

Actors

Antonio Bolivar, Brionne Davis, Jan Bijvoet, José Sabogal

Moods

Discussion-sparking, Instructive, Thought-provoking

This movie is gentle and utterly chaotic, intimate and massive, beautiful and ugly… it tries to be so many things and somehow pulls it off. It tells two stories parallel in time, based on the real-life diaries of two European scientists who traveled through the Amazon in the early and mid-twentieth century. Their stories are some of the only of accounts of Amazonian tribes in written history. The main character and guide in the movie is a shaman who met them both. At times delicate to the point of almost being able to feel the water, at times utterly apocalyptic and grand… to watch this movie is to take a journey through belief systems, through film… and to be brought along by cinematography that is at times unbelievably and absurdly beautiful. Meditative, violent, jarring, peaceful, luminous, ambitious, artful, heavy handed, graceful… it’s really an incredible film.

82. Upgrade (2018)

8.7

Country

Australia, United States of America

Director

Leigh Whannell

Actors

Abby Craden, Arthur Angel, Benedict Hardie, Betty Gabriel

This film really satisfied my craving for an original thriller, despite the fact that I spent most of it thinking about how Logan Marshall-Green looks like a budget Tom Hardy.

He plays a guy whose wife is killed during a violent mugging that also leaves him paralyzed in the aftermath. When a billionaire approaches him with an Artificial Intelligence solution that would “upgrade” his body, he has a chance to take vengeance.

This is Robocop meets Ex Machina meets Blade Runner. It’s original, low-budget without feeling low-budget, and honestly just so thrilling. It gives the genre of sci-fi a much needed upgrade.

83. Pain and Glory (2019)

best

8.7

Country

Spain

Director

Pedro Almodóvar

Actors

Agustín Almodóvar, Antonio Banderas, Asier Etxeandia, Asier Flores

Moods

A-list actors, Emotional, Romantic

This is the latest Oscar-nominated movie by Spain’s highest-regarded director, Pedro Almodóvar. It’s his most personal work to date, being a slightly fictionalized account of his youth and then the last couple of years. He is mostly portrayed by Antonio Banderas, who was also nominated for an Oscar for this role; while another star performance comes from Penélope Cruz who plays his mother in the flashback scenes. Pain and Glory is about life in the arts: how a tormented artistic personality is formed, the days of focusing on work over relationships, and dealing with the consequences later in life. It begs the question: in Almodóvar’s life, was the glory that got him to making as great of a movie as this one worth the pain?

84. De Palma (2015)

best

8.7

Country

United States of America

Director

Jake Paltrow, Noah Baumbach

Actors

Amy Irving, Brian De Palma, Kurt Russell, Mark Hamill

Moods

Easy, Instructive, Sunday

This autobiographical documentary covering the span of Brian DePalma’s 50+ year filmmaking career is taken from the man himself. From budget-less independent films to multi-million dollar box-office projects, he offers a fascinating professional history. But don’t expect critical analysis of his frequently controversial choices (such as the infamous oversized drill used as a murder weapon in Body Double)—he will acknowledge the existence of these issues, if only to grin and shrug them off, at times literally. What you can expect is to feel you are taken by the hand through Hollywood filmmaking experiences over the course of decades: negotiations, rewrites, stolen scripts, scuffling actors; tours of technical points of interest from his movies with commentary on deftly chosen film clips. You don’t have to be a fan to get a wealth of entertainment here. Not to be missed.

85. The Vanishing (1988)

best

8.7

Country

France, Germany, Netherlands

Director

George Sluizer

Actors

Bernadette Le Saché, Bernard-Pierre Donnadieu, Caroline Appéré, Didier Rousset

Moods

Dark, Depressing, Original

Fear of abandonment is at the heart of The Vanishing. Lovers Rex and Saskia are separated on their way to France after the latter vanishes without a trace. For the next three years, Rex dedicates his life to finding out what happened to Saskia in whatever way possible, endangering his own safety in the process. George Sluizer’s chilling psychological thriller shows the evils that curiosity and obsession can bring, and is a uniquely perverse look at the ugly side of truth-seeking.

86. Living (2022)

best

8.7

Country

Japan, Sweden, United Kingdom

Director

Oliver Hermanus

Actors

Adrian Rawlins, Aimee Lou Wood, Alex Sharp, Barney Fishwick

Moods

Dramatic, Emotional, Heart-warming

Adapted from the Japanese film Ikiru, which in turn was adapted from the Russian story The Death of Ivan Ilyich, Living is a parable about, well, living. Specifically, it’s about the importance of wonder and the magic of the mundane. It’s also about legacy and the stories we leave in our wake, which live on long after we’re gone. This familiar premise could have very easily been turned into another trite and cheesy movie that warns you to make the most out of your life, but thanks to a lean script, assured camerawork, and powerfully restrained performances, Living is elevated into something more special than that. It’s a technically beautiful, well told, and profoundly moving film, with Bill Nighy giving a career-best turn as a repressed man aching for meaning in his twilight years. 

87. The Remains of the Day (1993)

best

8.7

Country

UK, United Kingdom, United States of America

Director

James Ivory

Actors

Anthony Hopkins, Ben Chaplin, Brigitte Kahn, Caroline Hunt

Moods

A-list actors, Character-driven, Emotional

The visceral pain at the center of this adaptation from period drama powerhouse Merchant-Ivory comes not from fading or unrequited love but unrealized affection. Try as he might to repress his feelings, devoted butler Mr. Stevens (Anthony Hopkins) can’t stifle the blossoming attachment he shares with housemaid Miss Kenton (Emma Thompson). And yet, at every opportunity she gives him to do something about it, he balks, squandering the potential for something truly beautiful — something that actually belongs to them, not their aristocratic employer.

The Remains is partly told in flashbacks to the period leading up to the Second World War. From his stately home, Stevens’ master Lord Darlington and his peers play at international relations and try to avoid another war by pandering to the Nazis, but find they’re woefully under-equipped to decide the fate of Europe in this changing world. One of the many brilliant things about The Remains is the way this political drama doubles the devastation of Stevens’ die-hard commitment to his job — because now, he’s sacrificing his one chance at love for something that won’t even survive the decade. Sublime filmmaking and performances turn Stevens’ every minute choice into a pillar of profound tragedy, giving us a maddeningly heartwrenching life lesson for the ages.

88. Gosford Park (2001)

best

8.7

Country

Italy, United States of America

Director

Robert Altman

Actors

Adrian Scarborough, Alan Bates, Bob Balaban, Camilla Rutherford

Moods

A-list actors, Character-driven, Gripping

Gosford Park inspired screenwriter Julian Fellowes to create Downton Abbey — but don’t let that association fool you, because this is no quaint, sentimental period drama but a scalding satire of 1930s England class relations (even though Maggie Smith does play a withering dowager countess here, too). Robert Altman, master orchestrator of ensembles, assembled a banquet of performers here, including Michael Gambon, Kristin Scott Thomas, and Charles Dance as the well-to-do attendees of a hunting party on a grand estate. Working furiously to meet their every whim is the house’s domestic staff, played by such talents as Emily Watson, Helen Mirren, Kelly Macdonald, and Clive Owen.

The murder comes over an hour into the film, which ought to tell you about its real focus (Altman actually called Gosford Park a “who cares whodunnit”). In place of Agatha Christie-style intrigue is brilliant characterization and storytelling. Even at 137 minutes, 30-plus characters mean time is of the essence, but Altman and his actors miraculously find a way to convey a deep sense of each person — especially those downstairs. This tangle of rich lives never gets overwhelming, though, because Gosford Park is expertly paced. It’s nothing less than a joy to sit back and experience the masterful unraveling of its many threads, each more revelatory than the last.

89. Submarine (2011)

best

8.6

Country

UK, United Kingdom, United States of America

Director

Richard Ayoade

Actors

Adrienne O'Sullivan, Ben Stiller, Claire Cage, Craig Roberts

Moods

Easy, Feel-Good, Lighthearted

Awkward. That is how Oliver Tate can be described, and generally the whole movie. But it is professionally and scrutinizingly awkward. Submarine is a realistic teen comedy, one that makes sense and in which not everyone looks gorgeous and pretends to have a tough time. It is hilarious and sad, dark and touching. It is awesome and it’s embarrassing, and it’s the kind of movie that gets nearly everything about being a teen right, no matter where you grew up.

90. Kiss Kiss Bang Bang (2005)

best

8.6

Country

United States of America

Director

Shane Black

Actors

Ali Hillis, Angela Lindvall, Ariel Winter, Ben Hernandez Bray

Moods

A-list actors

Robert Downey Jr’s triumphant return to film, this movie is a satirical take on film noir and detective movies in general. The screen chemistry between Gay Perry the private eye, played by Val Kilmer, and Downey Jr’s robber turned actor, Harry Lockhart, is hysterical, and the film’s tongue in cheek nature is witty, smart, and delivers. Directed by the man who directed Lethal Weapon, the action is top notch, the laughs are pretty much constant, and the mystery is compelling. It’s mind boggling that nobody saw this when it came out.

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