2 Movies Like The Irishman (2019) On Mubi Canada

Staff & contributors

Chasing the feel of watching The Irishman ? Here are the movies we recommend you watch right after.

Martin Scorsese's "The Irishman" is a cinematic triumph that not only reunites some of the greatest actors of our time but also serves as a poignant reflection on the passage of time and the consequences of a life spent in organized crime. This film is a beautifully crafted epic that takes us on a journey through decades of American history and the shadowy underworld of the mafia. At its core, it's a character study of Frank Sheeran (Robert De Niro), a hitman with a conflicted conscience, portrayed with incredible depth and nuance. De Niro's performance is a testament to his acting prowess, as he seamlessly ages his character over the course of the film. Joe Pesci, coming out of retirement for this role, is nothing short of extraordinary as Russell Bufalino, the calm and calculated mob boss. Al Pacino is electrifying as Jimmy Hoffa, the charismatic union leader with a fiery temper. The film's narrative, told through the lens of Sheeran's recollections, gives us a unique perspective on historical events and the inner workings of organized crime. The de-aging technology used is impressive, allowing these veteran actors to convincingly portray their characters across decades. "The Irishman" is a sprawling masterpiece, a contemplative meditation on a life of crime, loyalty, and the inevitable consequences of one's choices. It's a must-see for cinephiles and anyone who appreciates compelling storytelling and exceptional acting. Scorsese's latest work cements his status as a cinematic legend.

This is the latest Oscar-nominated movie by Spain's highest-regarded director, Pedro Almodóvar. It's his most personal work to date, being a slightly fictionalized account of his youth and then the last couple of years. He is mostly portrayed by Antonio Banderas, who was also nominated for an Oscar for this role; while another star performance comes from Penélope Cruz who plays his mother in the flashback scenes. Pain and Glory is about life in the arts: how a tormented artistic personality is formed, the days of focusing on work over relationships, and dealing with the consequences later in life. It begs the question: in Almodóvar's life, was the glory that got him to making as great of a movie as this one worth the pain?

Genre: Drama

Actor: Agustín Almodóvar, Antonio Banderas, Asier Etxeandia, Asier Flores, Cecilia Roth, César Vicente, Constancia Céspedes, Esperanza Guardado, Esther García, Eva Martín, Fernando Iglesias, Julián López, Julieta Serrano, Leonardo Sbaraglia, Nora Navas, Paqui Horcajo, Pedro Casablanc, Penélope Cruz, Raúl Arévalo, Rosalía, Susi Sánchez, Xavi Sáez

Director: Pedro Almodóvar

Rating: R

Vague statement alert: Burning is not a movie that you “get”; it’s a movie you experience. Based on a short story by Murakami, it’s dark and bleak in a way that comes out more in the atmosphere of the movie rather than what happens in the story. Working in the capital Seoul, a young guy from a poor town near the North Korean border runs into a girl from his village. As he starts falling for her, she makes an unlikely acquaintance with one of Seoul’s wealthy youth (played by Korean-American actor Steven Yeun, pictured above.) This new character is mysterious in a way that’s all-too-common in South Korea: young people who have access to money no one knows where it came from, and who are difficult to predict or go against. Two worlds clash, poor and rich, in a movie that’s really three movies combined into one - a character-study, a romance, and a revenge thriller.

Genre: Drama, Mystery, Thriller

Actor: Ah-in Yoo, Ban Hye-ra, Cha Mi-Kyung, ChoI Seung-ho, Jang Won-hyung, Jeon Jong-seo, Jeon Seok-chan, Jeong Da-yi, Jong-seo Jun, Jun Jong-seo, Kim Shin-rock, Kim Shin-rok, Kim Sin-rock, Kim Soo-kyung, Lee Bong-ryeon, Lee Joong-ok, Lee Soo-jeong, Min Bok-gi, Moon Sung-keun, Ok Ja-yeon, Song Duk-ho, Soo-Kyung Kim, Steven Yeun, Yoo Ah-in

Director: Chang-dong Lee, Lee Chang-dong

Rating: Not Rated