100 Best Movies On Netflix India Right Now

100 Best Movies On Netflix India Right Now

February 20, 2024

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Netflix is undoubtedly the best film streaming service out there. However, the list of movies on Netflix India might seem limited or at least somewhat different from other countries. This is simply not true. What is happening is that Netflix is really overwhelming: it’s not the lack of options, it’s too many of them – something called the paradox of choice: the more you have to choose from, the harder it is to choose. As you’re reading through our list, you’ll come to understand that there is no shortage of great movies available to viewers in India. Each of the entries on this list is a highly rated, little known movie that was handpicked by our staff of movie enthusiasts. This page is also frequently updated so you never run out of great movies to watch. So without further ado, please meet our countdown of the best movies for Netflix India. You can browse all of our suggestions here.

51. Us and Them (2018)

7.8

Country

China

Director

Female director, Rene Liu

Actors

Andrew Tiernan, Boran Jing, Dongyu Zhou, Jack Roth

Moods

Character-driven, Dramatic, Emotional

Us and Them follows two former lovers who reminisce and reassess their decade-long relationship over one night. They both seem to be in better places, certainly financially if anything else, but their shared wistfulness for the past threatens to prove otherwise. 

The film was an immediate hit when it was first released in China, and it’s easy to see why. With just the right balance of realism, romance, and comedy, the movie makes for a simple but deeply moving and involving watch. You can’t help but root for the exes to get back together, even though you know as well as they do how minimal the chances of that happening are.

52. Beasts of No Nation (2015)

7.7

Country

Ghana, United States of America

Director

Cary Fukunaga, Cary Joji Fukunaga

Actors

Abraham Attah, Ama K. Abebrese, Andrew Adote, Cary Joji Fukunaga

Moods

Intense, Raw, Thought-provoking

An instant classic, Beast of No Nation is a unique and uniquely-paced war drama which ranges in patterns from explosive visual storytelling to calm character studies. A child joins a rebel group consisting almost entirely of children and led by a charismatic leader credited as Commandant. As you get to witness the conflict through the child’s eyes, his own development and his commander’s, the film unfolds as an exploration of the never ending state of war in Africa. It takes you to varying conclusions, most of which you will have trouble admitting you’ve reached. As Commandant, Idris Elba is transfixing, and the whole cast of almost entirely non-actors, as well as the deeply authentic staging by True Detective and Sin Nombre director Cary Fukunaga, are enthralling.

53. On My Skin (2018)

7.7

Country

Italy

Director

Alessio Cremonini

Actors

Aleksandros Memetaj, Alessandro Borghi, Alessio De Persio, Andrea Lattanzi

Moods

Depressing, Touching, True-story-based

This Netflix production is based on a case that rocked public opinion in Italy. Stefano Cucchi was arrested for a minor drug charge and died five days later from police brutality.

The movie takes its time to expose what Cucchi went through, which might lead some viewers to find On My Skin slow, and rightfully so. Thinking about the issues at hand here, it’s easy to understand why the director made that choice. In fact, Italians’ complex relationship with the Carabinieri, a division of the Italian army that carries out domestic policing, is delicate to explain and requires meticulous unveiling.

Nominated to nine David di Donatello Awards (the equivalent of the Academy Awards in Italy), of which it won three.

54. Your Name Engraved Herein (2020)

7.7

Country

Canada, Taiwan, United States of America

Director

Kuang-Hui Liu, Liu Kuang-hui

Actors

Barry Qu, Cheng-Yang Wu, Chih-ju Lin, David Chiu

Moods

Depressing, Emotional, Raw

Your Name Engraved Herein is a melancholy and emotional film set in 1987 just as martial law ends in Taiwan. The film explores the relationship between Jia-han and Birdy, two boys in a Catholic school who are in a romantic relationship. The movie tackles homophobia and social stigma in society which evokes a bleak and rather depressing atmosphere, emphasised by the movie’s earthy aesthetic. There is a rawness in the film’s narrative and dialogue, topped off by the lead actors’ successfully raw performances. Your Name Engraved Herein is tender as well as heartbreaking, occasionally depicting the joy of youth.

55. sex, lies, and videotape (1989)

7.7

Country

United States of America

Director

Steven Soderbergh

Actors

Alexandra Root, Andie MacDowell, David Foil, Earl T. Taylor

Moods

Character-driven, Original, Quirky

Remarkably, Steven Soderbergh was only 26 years old when he directed this coolly assured debut, the searingly candid script of which he also wrote in just eight days. Despite the pornographic implications of its title, this is more concerned with exploring whether honesty — not sex — is the means to real intimacy. In fact, the only nakedness glimpsed here is of the emotional kind, as twenty-something drifter Graham’s (James Spader) total aversion to lying has an infectious influence on everyone around him.

The primary recipient of that disarming effect is Ann (Andie MacDowell), the wife of Graham’s old college buddy who is blasé about sex and neurotic about everything else. Talking to Graham has a therapeutic effect on her, but he takes something else away from conversation: chronically impotent, he simulates the sexual experience by conducting erotically themed interviews with women on videotape. Preferring to sublimate his desires through his camcorder, Spader’s physically aloof character is a disturbingly prescient one for what it suggested then about technology’s future impact on human relationships. That Soderbergh managed to conduct such a complex psychosexual drama all through dialogue — on his first feature, no less — makes him exceedingly worthy of the record this earned him of the youngest solo Palme d’Or-winning director ever.

56. An Inspector Calls (2015)

7.7

Country

UK, United Kingdom

Director

Aisling Walsh, Female director

Actors

Chloe Pirrie, Chrissie Chow, David Thewlis, Donnie Yen

Moods

Discussion-sparking, Dramatic, Intense

A classic text of English literature classes is handsomely brought to life in this screen translation of the still-radical play An Inspector Calls. The Birlings, a wealthy industrialist family thriving in 1912 England, have a cozy family celebration shattered by the arrival of a police inspector investigating the suicide of a young working-class woman. But that’s not the only bubble that’s burst: as Inspector Goole (David Thewlis) interviews the family — gradually revealing the part each played in forcing the woman to such a desperate state — he holds a mirror up to the casual cruelty and entitlement with which the Birlings move through the world. Part of what makes JB Priestley’s original play so enduring is how these characters are used as a wider metaphor for their social classes, and that translates with delicate but undeniable force here. A damning indictment of individualism and blind privilege on original publication in 1945, this is a story that retains the same relevance and power today.

57. Dheepan (2015)

7.6

Country

France

Director

Jacques Audiard

Actors

Antonythasan Jesuthasan, Aymen Saïdi, Bass Dhem, Claudine Vinasithamby

Moods

Dramatic, Thought-provoking, Thrilling

Dheepan is a French film from the director of A Prophet. It contrasts elements of Sri Lankan and French culture to provide interesting insights into both, while crafting a heart-wrenching and heartwarming tale of makeshift families in unimaginable circumstances. Like A Prophet, Dheepan makes occasional and shocking use of violence to underscore elements of culture and illuminate the inner workings of the characters. A fascinating and exhilarating movie, winner of the 2015 Palme d’Or at Cannes.

58. Beats (2019)

7.6

Country

UK, United Kingdom

Director

Brian Welsh, Chris Robinson

Actors

Amy Manson, Anthony Anderson, Ashley Jackson, Brian Ferguson

Moods

Character-driven, Slice-of-Life

This drama is about two friends attempting to rave in 1994 Scotland, after a recent Thatcher-era law banned the act and all music “characterized by the emission of a succession of repetitive beats”.

Johnno and Spanner, one living in fear of his older brother and the other of his stepfather, want to turn things around by joining their first and probably last rave. They’re introduced to the world of illegal parties, a movement as influential as punk, that in the 1990s was born in reaction to the U.K.’s oppressive policies.

59. Little Big Women (2020)

7.6

Country

Taiwan

Director

Joseph Chen-Chieh Hsu, Joseph Hsu

Actors

Buffy Chen, Chang Han, Chen Shu-fang, Chen Yan-Fei

Moods

Character-driven, Dramatic, Lovely

This sensitive and elegantly crafted melodrama recognizes that a death in the family doesn’t have to lead to the same expressions of mourning we expect from movies; there might not be any real sadness at all. But when different family members come together again and bring their own personal conflicts with them, suddenly everyone else’s little griefs fill the space, and the road to recovery becomes even messier. Little Big Women understands all this with an understated touch and brilliant, naturalistic performances from its cast. It makes for a loving tribute to the generations of tough and complicated women who often hold a family together.

60. A Fortunate Man (2018)

7.5

Country

Denmark

Director

Bille August

Actors

Anders Hove, Benjamin Kitter, Bille August, Carsten Kressner

Moods

Slow

This is a gorgeous Danish period drama that’s based on a famous story and book in Denmark called Lykke-Per (or Lucky Per) by Nobel Prize-winning author Henrik Pontoppidan.

Per, the son of an overbearing catholic priest, leaves his family house in the country side to seek a new life in Copenhagen. His passion about engineering was at the time contrary with the Christian faith, but manages to introduce him to the capital’s elite, and a chance at social ascension.

Lykke-Per and A Fortunate Man are about nature versus nurture. Per’s passion about engineering and renewable energy (back in the 1920s) is set against his need to emancipate and the pride that was instilled in him by his upbringing.

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