50 Best Movies On Amazon Prime You Haven’t Yet Seen

50 Best Movies On Amazon Prime You Haven’t Yet Seen

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Amazon Prime doesn’t exactly have the most intuitive interface, and the goal of this list is to bring to your attention the great movies that hide in the platform. This list 50 is only the tip of the iceberg. For more, go back to the agoodmovietowatch.com homepage and select Amazon Prime from the sidebar.

50. The Outfit (2022)

7.4

Country

United Kingdom, United States of America

Director

Graham Moore

Actors

Dylan O'Brien, Johnathan McClain, Johnny Flynn, Mark Rylance

Moods

A-list actors, Action-packed, Dramatic

The Outfit doesn’t need to do a lot to be as sleek and surprising as it is. In fact, much of the film takes place in a single place while consisting of only a few (albeit memorable) characters. It’s deceptively simple, but the tricks it hides up its sleeves are plentiful and pleasurable. It’s a well-made and even better-performed gangster movie. Led by a quietly powerful Mark Rylance (who plays Leonard, the tailor with hidden depths), the actors are serious enough to lend it gravitas but easygoing enough to make it light on its feet.  

All in all, The Outfit is an agile action film with twists that will keep you at the edge of your seat right till the very end. 

49. Good Night Oppy (2022)

7.4

Country

United States of America

Director

Ryan White

Actors

Angela Bassett

Moods

Feel-Good, Inspiring, Lovely

In 2003, NASA launched twin rovers Oppy (short for Opportunity) and Spirit into Mars expecting them to last for only 90 days. But equipped with almost human-like perseverance and personality, the rovers lasted for years, tracing terrain and reporting extraterrestrial findings back to Earth until Oppy’s final goodbye in 2018.

Good Night Oppy follows the rovers and the team who made their journeys possible, discovering warmth and emotion in the daunting task that is finding life on Mars. It’s as informational as it is inspirational, a gratifying watch on all accounts.

48. Eye in the Sky (2015)

7.4

Country

d, UK, United Kingdom

Director

Gavin Hood

Actors

Aaron Paul, Aisha Takow, Alan Rickman, Armaan Haggio

Moods

A-list actors, Thought-provoking, Well-acted

Is an innocent child’s life worth millions of other civilian casualties? In a modern-day drone warfare led by Colonel Katherine Powell, played by the very versatile Helen Mirren, she is conflicted to order the target of the Somali terrorist organization when she spots Alia, a young girl who just happens to be selling bread within the premises of the Kill Zone. Her icy exterior, however, is a far cry from Lieutenant General Frank Benson’s profound sympathy, the portrayal of the late Alan Rickman in his last onscreen role being one of his most remarkable ones to date. Eye in the Sky is a thriller that will have you questioning your morals while gripping your seats in what appears to be a battle of the best choice and the only one. Do the ends always justify the means?

47. Things We Lost in the Fire (2007)

7.5

Country

Canada, UK, United States of America

Director

Female director, Susanne Bier

Actors

Alexis Llewellyn, Alison Lohman, Benicio Del Toro, David Duchovny

Moods

Emotional, Slow, Touching

Things We Lost in the Fire is a touching drama about Audrey (Hall Berry), a married mother-of-two, whose husband Brian (David Duchovny) is killed tragically in a random act of violence. Amidst her grief she comes to connect with Jerry (Benicio Del Toro), Brian’s childhood friend who is living an isolated life as a junkie, and ultimately invites him to live with her and her children. What may sound like a formulaic set-up, with broken souls coming together to find mutual reconciliation, is elevated immeasurably by Susanne Bier’s deft directorial hand. The celebrated director of After the Wedding and In A Better World weaves a poignant narrative about loss and human connectivity, featuring stunningly good performances by both Berry and Del Toro. It’s a film that’s likely to surprise you with its heartfelt tenderness and compassion.

46. Human Flow (2017)

7.5

Country

China, France, Germany

Director

Ai Weiwei, Weiwei Ai

Actors

Fadi Abou Akleh, Hiba Abed, Israa Abboud, Marin Din Kajdomcaj

Moods

Depressing, Tear-jerker, Thought-provoking

Chinese artist Ai Weiwei directs his attention towards the ongoing refugee crisis, the biggest displacement of people since World War II. His documentary is apolitical and tries to focus on the human side of the picture. It’s not a news report or a commentary on the causes of the situation. Instead, it’s a combination of heartfelt stories spanning 23 countries that showcase people’s battle for dignity and basic rights. A truly epic movie complemented by impressive drone footage that’s as impressive as it is sad.

45. Lars and the Real Girl (2007)

7.5

Country

Canada, United States of America

Director

Craig Gillespie

Actors

Alec McClure, Angela Vint, Annabelle Torsein, Arnold Pinnock

Moods

A-list actors, Grown-up Comedy, Sunday

Starring Ryan Gosling, Emily Mortimer, Paul Schneider, Kelli Garner and Patricia Clarkson. Lars and the Real Girl is a funny and thought-provoking look at the psychology of loneliness and the healing power of love. I rented this a few years back because of Ryan Gosling – he had just blown me away in Fracture so I was trying to catch up on his other movies. It was an unexpected gem. One of the sweetest movies I have ever seen – it was kind of like a fairy tale. With a blow-up doll. Yes, that’s right.

44. Croupier (1998)

7.6

Country

France, Germany, Ireland

Director

Mike Hodges

Actors

Alex Kingston, Alexander Morton, Barnaby Kay, Clive Owen

Moods

A-list actors, Suspenseful, Thrilling

Clive Owen stars as a struggling writer who reluctantly accepts a lucrative offer to work as a croupier at a London casino. His characteristic aloofness, hatred of gambling, and sharp observational skills allow him to remain uncompromised and able to catch any attempt at cheating within his field of vision. But when a savvy professional gambler he shares an attraction with asks him to participate in a heist in an uncompromised way, he’s forced to consider playing the angles. Owen’s coolly detached performance is a marvel, and the depiction of the London casino scene is detailed and gritty, both of which make for compelling British noir.

43. Kuessipan (2019)

7.6

Country

Canada

Director

Myriam Verreault

Actors

Brigitte Poupart, Étienne Galloy, Katinen Grégoire-Fontaine

This coming-of-age drama set near Sept-Îles in Quebec, Canada is about two indigenous Innu best friends who grow up together. One day, one of them meets a white guy and starts planning a life with him, which is seen by both her best friend and her community as a rupture with them.

“If everybody did the same thing you’re doing, we wouldn’t exist,” her friend tells her. Kuessipan is about that intersection between friends growing apart and indigenous identity, all set in the backdrop of Canadian reserve life. Won the Grand Prix at the Québec City Film Festival.

42. Bull (2019)

7.6

Country

United States of America

Director

Annie Silverstein, Female director

Actors

Amber Havard, Rob Morgan, Sarah Albright, Troy Hogan

Moods

Depressing, Gripping, Well-acted

Bull is a gritty and haunting drama featuring a phenomenal performance by Rob Morgan as a bullfighter. In a poor Houston suburb, he plays an aging and lonely black man doing everything he can to survive. He brushes off unrelenting racism, rides even when it’s life-threatening and raises chickens to sell them. His next-door neighbor is a grandmother taking care of her daughter’s kids while the daughter is in jail. One day one of these grandaughters harms the chickens and vandalizes Abe’s house, prompting them to clash.

41. You Were Never Really Here (2018)

7.6

Country

France, UK, United Kingdom

Director

Female director, Lynne Ramsay

Actors

Alessandro Nivola, Alex Manette, Claire Hsu, Cristina Dohmen

Moods

A-list actors, Dark, Intense

The performance of a pot-bellied Joaquin Phoenix is nothing short of perfection. He brilliantly portrays a hitman down on his luck who happens to rescue a kidnapped teenage girl. It’s a tight movie, running a short 89 minutes. It makes a point that sticks. Pure entertainment, pure acting, and amazing directing by Lynne Ramsay (who also directed We Need to Talk About Kevin).

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